KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

RELIGIOUS

Tampa, Florida

2010 – Tampa Bay AIA Unbuilt Design Award

All structural elements are candidly expressed. Long concrete beams extend from the east entrance to the west end, pulling the visitor out to the west terrace and the cross. The arms of the concrete Christian cross are aligned with the concrete beams, and seem to complete the structure.

On the west end of the site, the roof extends 25 feet beyond the envelope of the building to shade a wide dining terrace. The site rapidly drops, allowing for the west terrace to be elevated a full story above the wooded site. On the east side, the beams cantilever 12’ beyond the last column line to carry and expose a wood truss over the entry.

The mechanical systems, on the other hand, are concealed. The design takes advantage of the difference in elevation by placing all ducts and mechanical equipment below the main floor. Cold air is blown up through floor registers. High return air grills forces the heavy cold air to circulate over the congregation. A long exterior leveled bridge provides an exterior means of access to the terrace.

The center together with the existing church creates a small shared courtyard. The addition is slightly rotated from the axis of the church to save a large camphor tree. The kitchen is an important shared space for the Korean community. It is serviced by members of the congregation and is visible from both the shared courtyard and the main hall.

KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

RELIGIOUS

Tampa, Florida

2010 – Tampa Bay AIA Unbuilt Design Award

All structural elements are candidly expressed. Long concrete beams extend from the east entrance to the west end, pulling the visitor out to the west terrace and the cross. The arms of the concrete Christian cross are aligned with the concrete beams, and seem to complete the structure.

On the west end of the site, the roof extends 25 feet beyond the envelope of the building to shade a wide dining terrace. The site rapidly drops, allowing for the west terrace to be elevated a full story above the wooded site. On the east side, the beams cantilever 12’ beyond the last column line to carry and expose a wood truss over the entry.

The mechanical systems, on the other hand, are concealed. The design takes advantage of the difference in elevation by placing all ducts and mechanical equipment below the main floor. Cold air is blown up through floor registers. High return air grills forces the heavy cold air to circulate over the congregation. A long exterior leveled bridge provides an exterior means of access to the terrace.

The center together with the existing church creates a small shared courtyard. The addition is slightly rotated from the axis of the church to save a large camphor tree. The kitchen is an important shared space for the Korean community. It is serviced by members of the congregation and is visible from both the shared courtyard and the main hall.

KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

RELIGIOUS

Tampa, Florida

2010 – Tampa Bay AIA Unbuilt Design Award

All structural elements are candidly expressed. Long concrete beams extend from the east entrance to the west end, pulling the visitor out to the west terrace and the cross. The arms of the concrete Christian cross are aligned with the concrete beams, and seem to complete the structure.

On the west end of the site, the roof extends 25 feet beyond the envelope of the building to shade a wide dining terrace. The site rapidly drops, allowing for the west terrace to be elevated a full story above the wooded site. On the east side, the beams cantilever 12’ beyond the last column line to carry and expose a wood truss over the entry.

The mechanical systems, on the other hand, are concealed. The design takes advantage of the difference in elevation by placing all ducts and mechanical equipment below the main floor. Cold air is blown up through floor registers. High return air grills forces the heavy cold air to circulate over the congregation. A long exterior leveled bridge provides an exterior means of access to the terrace.

The center together with the existing church creates a small shared courtyard. The addition is slightly rotated from the axis of the church to save a large camphor tree. The kitchen is an important shared space for the Korean community. It is serviced by members of the congregation and is visible from both the shared courtyard and the main hall.

KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

RELIGIOUS

Tampa, Florida

2010 – Tampa Bay AIA Unbuilt Design Award

All structural elements are candidly expressed. Long concrete beams extend from the east entrance to the west end, pulling the visitor out to the west terrace and the cross. The arms of the concrete Christian cross are aligned with the concrete beams, and seem to complete the structure.

On the west end of the site, the roof extends 25 feet beyond the envelope of the building to shade a wide dining terrace. The site rapidly drops, allowing for the west terrace to be elevated a full story above the wooded site. On the east side, the beams cantilever 12’ beyond the last column line to carry and expose a wood truss over the entry.

The mechanical systems, on the other hand, are concealed. The design takes advantage of the difference in elevation by placing all ducts and mechanical equipment below the main floor. Cold air is blown up through floor registers. High return air grills forces the heavy cold air to circulate over the congregation. A long exterior leveled bridge provides an exterior means of access to the terrace.

The center together with the existing church creates a small shared courtyard. The addition is slightly rotated from the axis of the church to save a large camphor tree. The kitchen is an important shared space for the Korean community. It is serviced by members of the congregation and is visible from both the shared courtyard and the main hall.

KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

RELIGIOUS

Tampa, Florida

2010 – Tampa Bay AIA Unbuilt Design Award

All structural elements are candidly expressed. Long concrete beams extend from the east entrance to the west end, pulling the visitor out to the west terrace and the cross. The arms of the concrete Christian cross are aligned with the concrete beams, and seem to complete the structure.

On the west end of the site, the roof extends 25 feet beyond the envelope of the building to shade a wide dining terrace. The site rapidly drops, allowing for the west terrace to be elevated a full story above the wooded site. On the east side, the beams cantilever 12’ beyond the last column line to carry and expose a wood truss over the entry.

The mechanical systems, on the other hand, are concealed. The design takes advantage of the difference in elevation by placing all ducts and mechanical equipment below the main floor. Cold air is blown up through floor registers. High return air grills forces the heavy cold air to circulate over the congregation. A long exterior leveled bridge provides an exterior means of access to the terrace.

The center together with the existing church creates a small shared courtyard. The addition is slightly rotated from the axis of the church to save a large camphor tree. The kitchen is an important shared space for the Korean community. It is serviced by members of the congregation and is visible from both the shared courtyard and the main hall.

KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

RELIGIOUS

Tampa, Florida

2010 – Tampa Bay AIA Unbuilt Design Award

All structural elements are candidly expressed. Long concrete beams extend from the east entrance to the west end, pulling the visitor out to the west terrace and the cross. The arms of the concrete Christian cross are aligned with the concrete beams, and seem to complete the structure.

On the west end of the site, the roof extends 25 feet beyond the envelope of the building to shade a wide dining terrace. The site rapidly drops, allowing for the west terrace to be elevated a full story above the wooded site. On the east side, the beams cantilever 12’ beyond the last column line to carry and expose a wood truss over the entry.

The mechanical systems, on the other hand, are concealed. The design takes advantage of the difference in elevation by placing all ducts and mechanical equipment below the main floor. Cold air is blown up through floor registers. High return air grills forces the heavy cold air to circulate over the congregation. A long exterior leveled bridge provides an exterior means of access to the terrace.

The center together with the existing church creates a small shared courtyard. The addition is slightly rotated from the axis of the church to save a large camphor tree. The kitchen is an important shared space for the Korean community. It is serviced by members of the congregation and is visible from both the shared courtyard and the main hall.