SOLSTICE RESIDENCE

SOLSTICE RESIDENCE

RESIDENTIAL

The property is located at the mouth of a river as it opens to the Bay.  Instead of fronting other residential properties across the narrow creek, the main spaces look to the horizon in the direction of the summer solstice.

The design relies on Adelbarto Libera’s 1937 Villa Malaparte as a historical precedent.  An exterior stair along the river's course leads to a fully occupiable roof shaded terrace.  The structure is placed along the river's edge and rotated to face the summer solstice's setting sun.  Wide overhanging terraces and the cantilevering roof stretches the house towards the Bay. 

The roof terrace stair steps to give additional height to the living below and to offer distant views of the barrier islands.  A laminated rough cypress pergola shades the lower part of the terrace.  The 28 feet long cypress beams span across the entire width of house and penetrate through the massing of the elevator tower.

 

Due to the high flood elevation, the first living level had to be raised a full story above grade.  The bedroom wing and offices are arranged on the first habitable level, while the main living spaces are on the third floor to take full advantage of the long views over the Sarasota Bay. 

The formal dining room cantilevers 8 feet from the façade.  Facing south, the dining room volume casts dramatic shadows on the street elevation.  To break the climb to the roof terrace, a wide entry stair placed outside along the south facing street façade.  The second flight of stair is conditioned and leads directly to the main living spaces, while the roof terrace is reached from the main living spaces through an outdoor stair along the northern façade. The Schrock House extends the Sarasota School of Architecture’s interest in utilizing rigorous formal strategies to mediate between universal, democratic space and the uniquely delicate landscape and horizon of the Florida’s west coast.  The design interprets the conditions of the site in such a way that the house mediates between the land and the sea, and the land and the sky.

SOLSTICE RESIDENCE

SOLSTICE RESIDENCE

RESIDENTIAL

The property is located at the mouth of a river as it opens to the Bay.  Instead of fronting other residential properties across the narrow creek, the main spaces look to the horizon in the direction of the summer solstice.

The design relies on Adelbarto Libera’s 1937 Villa Malaparte as a historical precedent.  An exterior stair along the river's course leads to a fully occupiable roof shaded terrace.  The structure is placed along the river's edge and rotated to face the summer solstice's setting sun.  Wide overhanging terraces and the cantilevering roof stretches the house towards the Bay. 

The roof terrace stair steps to give additional height to the living below and to offer distant views of the barrier islands.  A laminated rough cypress pergola shades the lower part of the terrace.  The 28 feet long cypress beams span across the entire width of house and penetrate through the massing of the elevator tower.

 

Due to the high flood elevation, the first living level had to be raised a full story above grade.  The bedroom wing and offices are arranged on the first habitable level, while the main living spaces are on the third floor to take full advantage of the long views over the Sarasota Bay. 

The formal dining room cantilevers 8 feet from the façade.  Facing south, the dining room volume casts dramatic shadows on the street elevation.  To break the climb to the roof terrace, a wide entry stair placed outside along the south facing street façade.  The second flight of stair is conditioned and leads directly to the main living spaces, while the roof terrace is reached from the main living spaces through an outdoor stair along the northern façade. The Schrock House extends the Sarasota School of Architecture’s interest in utilizing rigorous formal strategies to mediate between universal, democratic space and the uniquely delicate landscape and horizon of the Florida’s west coast.  The design interprets the conditions of the site in such a way that the house mediates between the land and the sea, and the land and the sky.

SOLSTICE RESIDENCE

SOLSTICE RESIDENCE

RESIDENTIAL

The property is located at the mouth of a river as it opens to the Bay.  Instead of fronting other residential properties across the narrow creek, the main spaces look to the horizon in the direction of the summer solstice.

The design relies on Adelbarto Libera’s 1937 Villa Malaparte as a historical precedent.  An exterior stair along the river's course leads to a fully occupiable roof shaded terrace.  The structure is placed along the river's edge and rotated to face the summer solstice's setting sun.  Wide overhanging terraces and the cantilevering roof stretches the house towards the Bay. 

The roof terrace stair steps to give additional height to the living below and to offer distant views of the barrier islands.  A laminated rough cypress pergola shades the lower part of the terrace.  The 28 feet long cypress beams span across the entire width of house and penetrate through the massing of the elevator tower.

 

Due to the high flood elevation, the first living level had to be raised a full story above grade.  The bedroom wing and offices are arranged on the first habitable level, while the main living spaces are on the third floor to take full advantage of the long views over the Sarasota Bay. 

The formal dining room cantilevers 8 feet from the façade.  Facing south, the dining room volume casts dramatic shadows on the street elevation.  To break the climb to the roof terrace, a wide entry stair placed outside along the south facing street façade.  The second flight of stair is conditioned and leads directly to the main living spaces, while the roof terrace is reached from the main living spaces through an outdoor stair along the northern façade. The Schrock House extends the Sarasota School of Architecture’s interest in utilizing rigorous formal strategies to mediate between universal, democratic space and the uniquely delicate landscape and horizon of the Florida’s west coast.  The design interprets the conditions of the site in such a way that the house mediates between the land and the sea, and the land and the sky.

SOLSTICE RESIDENCE

SOLSTICE RESIDENCE

RESIDENTIAL

The property is located at the mouth of a river as it opens to the Bay.  Instead of fronting other residential properties across the narrow creek, the main spaces look to the horizon in the direction of the summer solstice.

The design relies on Adelbarto Libera’s 1937 Villa Malaparte as a historical precedent.  An exterior stair along the river's course leads to a fully occupiable roof shaded terrace.  The structure is placed along the river's edge and rotated to face the summer solstice's setting sun.  Wide overhanging terraces and the cantilevering roof stretches the house towards the Bay. 

The roof terrace stair steps to give additional height to the living below and to offer distant views of the barrier islands.  A laminated rough cypress pergola shades the lower part of the terrace.  The 28 feet long cypress beams span across the entire width of house and penetrate through the massing of the elevator tower.

 

Due to the high flood elevation, the first living level had to be raised a full story above grade.  The bedroom wing and offices are arranged on the first habitable level, while the main living spaces are on the third floor to take full advantage of the long views over the Sarasota Bay. 

The formal dining room cantilevers 8 feet from the façade.  Facing south, the dining room volume casts dramatic shadows on the street elevation.  To break the climb to the roof terrace, a wide entry stair placed outside along the south facing street façade.  The second flight of stair is conditioned and leads directly to the main living spaces, while the roof terrace is reached from the main living spaces through an outdoor stair along the northern façade. The Schrock House extends the Sarasota School of Architecture’s interest in utilizing rigorous formal strategies to mediate between universal, democratic space and the uniquely delicate landscape and horizon of the Florida’s west coast.  The design interprets the conditions of the site in such a way that the house mediates between the land and the sea, and the land and the sky.

SOLSTICE RESIDENCE

SOLSTICE RESIDENCE

RESIDENTIAL

The property is located at the mouth of a river as it opens to the Bay.  Instead of fronting other residential properties across the narrow creek, the main spaces look to the horizon in the direction of the summer solstice.

The design relies on Adelbarto Libera’s 1937 Villa Malaparte as a historical precedent.  An exterior stair along the river's course leads to a fully occupiable roof shaded terrace.  The structure is placed along the river's edge and rotated to face the summer solstice's setting sun.  Wide overhanging terraces and the cantilevering roof stretches the house towards the Bay. 

The roof terrace stair steps to give additional height to the living below and to offer distant views of the barrier islands.  A laminated rough cypress pergola shades the lower part of the terrace.  The 28 feet long cypress beams span across the entire width of house and penetrate through the massing of the elevator tower.

 

Due to the high flood elevation, the first living level had to be raised a full story above grade.  The bedroom wing and offices are arranged on the first habitable level, while the main living spaces are on the third floor to take full advantage of the long views over the Sarasota Bay. 

The formal dining room cantilevers 8 feet from the façade.  Facing south, the dining room volume casts dramatic shadows on the street elevation.  To break the climb to the roof terrace, a wide entry stair placed outside along the south facing street façade.  The second flight of stair is conditioned and leads directly to the main living spaces, while the roof terrace is reached from the main living spaces through an outdoor stair along the northern façade. The Schrock House extends the Sarasota School of Architecture’s interest in utilizing rigorous formal strategies to mediate between universal, democratic space and the uniquely delicate landscape and horizon of the Florida’s west coast.  The design interprets the conditions of the site in such a way that the house mediates between the land and the sea, and the land and the sky.

SOLSTICE RESIDENCE

SOLSTICE RESIDENCE

RESIDENTIAL

The property is located at the mouth of a river as it opens to the Bay.  Instead of fronting other residential properties across the narrow creek, the main spaces look to the horizon in the direction of the summer solstice.

The design relies on Adelbarto Libera’s 1937 Villa Malaparte as a historical precedent.  An exterior stair along the river's course leads to a fully occupiable roof shaded terrace.  The structure is placed along the river's edge and rotated to face the summer solstice's setting sun.  Wide overhanging terraces and the cantilevering roof stretches the house towards the Bay. 

The roof terrace stair steps to give additional height to the living below and to offer distant views of the barrier islands.  A laminated rough cypress pergola shades the lower part of the terrace.  The 28 feet long cypress beams span across the entire width of house and penetrate through the massing of the elevator tower.

 

Due to the high flood elevation, the first living level had to be raised a full story above grade.  The bedroom wing and offices are arranged on the first habitable level, while the main living spaces are on the third floor to take full advantage of the long views over the Sarasota Bay. 

The formal dining room cantilevers 8 feet from the façade.  Facing south, the dining room volume casts dramatic shadows on the street elevation.  To break the climb to the roof terrace, a wide entry stair placed outside along the south facing street façade.  The second flight of stair is conditioned and leads directly to the main living spaces, while the roof terrace is reached from the main living spaces through an outdoor stair along the northern façade. The Schrock House extends the Sarasota School of Architecture’s interest in utilizing rigorous formal strategies to mediate between universal, democratic space and the uniquely delicate landscape and horizon of the Florida’s west coast.  The design interprets the conditions of the site in such a way that the house mediates between the land and the sea, and the land and the sky.